Teaching with Technology Home » Zoom Provides Solution for Instructors’ Worst-Case Scenarios

blank-screenYou’re preparing for a lecture in Lecture Hall 1. Suddenly a podium malfunction takes Haivision down and the projectors offline. And because Echo360 wasn’t scheduled, you can’t even record your lecture for viewing later.

 

Class starts in 10 minutes. What do you do? WHAT DO YOU DO?

 

 

This scenario really happened, and it’s only one of many that can keep instructors awake at night. If the instructors had Zoom, however, they might sleep a little better.

Zoom is a cloud-based video conferencing and group collaboration tool which offers cross-platform capability and HD quality video and audio through a simple, user-friendly interface.

zoom-applications

 

blank-screenLet’s revisit the last scenario. To review:

  • Haivision is down
  • Projectors are down
  • Echo360 is not scheduled

This time, we’ll assume the instructor has downloaded Zoom to his laptop. This is how the lecture goes:

INSTRUCTOR launches Zoom from the podium computer or his laptop and starts a meeting.

STUDENTS download Zoom to their laptops and log into the meeting using the Meeting ID.
INSTRUCTOR records session using Zoom audio and screen capture feature.
INSTRUCTOR begins lecturing, shares screen with PowerPoint presentation.

STUDENTS view PowerPoint while hearing lecture audio.
INSTRUCTOR uses Zoom tools to annotate slides, manage students and open chat window for questions.

STUDENTS submit questions using the chat feature.
STUDENTS review lecture later by viewing recorded session.

zoom-storm

Consider another worst-case scenario that can happen to any instructor with very little warning. A moderate earthquake or storm hits an area near the instructor’s home and traffic in the area is tied up for hours. There’s no way the instructor can make it to campus, and students are notified accordingly. But with Zoom, she doesn’t have to cancel the class.  Here’s how this scenario would play out.

INSTRUCTOR launches Zoom from his personal computer or laptop and starts a meeting.

From wherever they are, STUDENTS download Zoom to their personal computers, laptops or smartphones and log into the meeting using the Meeting ID.
INSTRUCTOR records session using Zoom audio and screen capture feature.
INSTRUCTOR begins lecturing, shares screen with PowerPoint presentation.

STUDENTS view PowerPoint while hearing lecture audio.
INSTRUCTOR uses Zoom tools to annotate slides, manage students and open chat window for questions.

STUDENTS submit questions using the chat feature.
STUDENTS review lecture later by viewing recorded session.

 

zoom-airportHere’s a worst-case scenario that can affect instructors and guest lecturers alike. Suppose a visiting faculty member is scheduled to deliver a lecture in Classroom A.  Weather conditions or technical glitches delay the flight’s arrival and the guest lecturer is stuck in the airport with nothing but his smartphone. Fortunately, his presentation is stored in Google Drive and his smartphone has the Zoom app.

GUEST LECTURER launches Zoom from his smartphone and starts a meeting.

GUEST LECTURER downloads presentation from Google drive and opens on his smartphone.

From the classroom or wherever they are, STUDENTS download Zoom to their personal computers, laptops or smartphones and log into the meeting using the Meeting ID.
GUEST LECTURER records session using Zoom audio and screen capture feature.
GUEST LECTURER begins lecturing, shares screen with PowerPoint presentation. STUDENTS view PowerPoint while hearing lecture audio.
GUEST LECTURER uses Zoom tools to annotate slides, manage students and open chat window for questions. STUDENTS submit questions using the chat feature.
STUDENTS review lecture later by viewing recorded session.

We’d love to hear about your worst-case scenarios. For more information on Zoom, please contact:

mbradford-thumb

 

Mike Bradford, Manager of classroom & Multimedia Services, at mbradford@westernu.edu.

 

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